Testing, training

SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks

What’s the big deal about CFU? Ask Brian.

“Brian can’t tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 and he sure can’t begin to read! He’s severe! Good luck on that one!” That was my first introduction to a very “special” student as I began my career in education.

Brian had a problem with CFU. CFU is just one of six intellectual abilities that you have to have to be ready to read. What does that mean? And what does identifying a picture tell me about being able to read?

In the world of the Structure of Intellect, CFU stands for Cognition of Figural Units. It is the ability to look at a picture or representation of an object that has been partially erased and to be able to tell what that object is. In other words, it is the ability of your brain to fill in the blanks and make sense of what seems at first to be only random marks on the page. This skill, when applied to letters or symbols, makes up the gateway to reading.

Remember picture finding in your “Highlights for Children” magazines? It wasn’t just a fun activity, or a not so fun activity if you were unsuccessful. There was a reason for it! I now know that each of Brian’s eyes were seeing something different. That “dreamy” look he had when I looked at him now makes sense. How do you tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 when one eye places the right angle at one spot on the page and the other eye places it elsewhere? And, maybe it doesn’t place it in the same place the next Continue reading “SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks”

learning skills, training

Vision: Focusing Skills

Vision: “The ability of sight, the manner in which one sees or conceives of something”

Think about it:

If you are unable to scan horizontally – a visual requisite for reading and closing letters into words that are meaningful – your achievement level drops.

If you are unable to distinguish small differences (visual discrimination), which is especially critical for sustained reading over an extended period of time, your achievement level drops.

If you are unable to understand vocabulary and verbal ideas due to visual fatigue and loss of concentration, your achievement level drops.

If you have jerky eye movement when following an object, excessive head movement, overshooting the target, fatigue, and clumsiness – symptoms of poor eye tracking – your achievement level drops.

The SOI-IPP program has been able to screen people with these conditions and prepare a course of action. For severe cases of these vision issues, the best therapy is a developmental optometrist. SOI realizes the value of such treatment and encourages people to pursue this venue.

Vision can be the hindrance for learning success. Students receive the OK from the school nurse that their vision is 20/20, but classroom performance says otherwise. If a student is suspected of having vision problems, every avenue should be pursued to correct the deficiency. Build a foundation: strengthen the teamwork of the eyes so the learning experience is enjoyable.

SOI has designed a new vision workbook that targets these focusing skills! The workbook concentrates on the areas of visual tracking and stamina. Parents and teachers are invited to use this tool as part of their student exercises in developing good vision skills. Whether you are in a school, clinic, or at home, this workbook is great option! Take a look at the sample pages below.

written by: Jody Brooks, SOI Systems general manager