Classrooms, learning skills, Unique Issues

Reading with LOCAN


LOCAN is a new method for teaching reading.

Most children who have not learned to read by the third grade are probably figurally-dominant. They are labeled “learning disabled” or “dyslexic” because they cannot read. Concrete learners will also probably struggle to progress in reading with any of the existing methods. Or, if they do learn to “read,” it will probably be reading without comprehension. All children who are preliterate or non literate can benefit from LOCAN!

LOCAN is a hieroglyphic language, making it direct and concrete. Every word in the language has its own glyph. Picture-characters (or glyphs) stand for words. One picture-character equals one word. The meaning is directly represented in the symbol. Children first learn to read logos, trademarks, stop signs, etc. It is the natural way to learn to read. LOCAN extends this natural experience into the English language.

It is easy to acquire vocabulary, and is much easier than Continue reading “Reading with LOCAN”

Testing, training

SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks

What’s the big deal about CFU? Ask Brian.

“Brian can’t tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 and he sure can’t begin to read! He’s severe! Good luck on that one!” That was my first introduction to a very “special” student as I began my career in education.

Brian had a problem with CFU. CFU is just one of six intellectual abilities that you have to have to be ready to read. What does that mean? And what does identifying a picture tell me about being able to read?

In the world of the Structure of Intellect, CFU stands for Cognition of Figural Units. It is the ability to look at a picture or representation of an object that has been partially erased and to be able to tell what that object is. In other words, it is the ability of your brain to fill in the blanks and make sense of what seems at first to be only random marks on the page. This skill, when applied to letters or symbols, makes up the gateway to reading.

Remember picture finding in your “Highlights for Children” magazines? It wasn’t just a fun activity, or a not so fun activity if you were unsuccessful. There was a reason for it! I now know that each of Brian’s eyes were seeing something different. That “dreamy” look he had when I looked at him now makes sense. How do you tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 when one eye places the right angle at one spot on the page and the other eye places it elsewhere? And, maybe it doesn’t place it in the same place the next Continue reading “SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks”