inspiration

How Can We Build Resilience in Children During the Pandemic?

Coronavirus is being a spoilsport of 2020 so far for everyone – be it children, adults or the elderly. It has taken the world by surprise and nobody knows how long will it continue like this. When we are faced inevitable adversity like this in life, to achieve our intended goals and finding happiness, a person’s ability to cope and resilience play a very important role. The ability to thrive despite these challenges arises from the skills of resilience.  The good news is,  parents can teach resilience skills to their children.

Building resilience — It is the ability to adapt well to adversity or even significant sources of stress. We can help our children manage stress and feelings of anxiety and uncertainty. Resilience should be developed from an early age, and we should proactively help our children develop it as well. Following are tips for building resilience.

  • By lending a helping hand: Encourage your child to help others, because children who may feel helpless can be empowered by helping others. Parents should encourage the child in age-appropriate volunteering work.
  • Have a daily routine: Daily routines help children to complete their task and is comforting for them, especially younger children who like structure in their lives. Encourage your child to develop his or her own way of a daily routine
  • Unstructured time:  Build in unstructured time during the day to allow children to be creative and inquisitive. Make sure that your child does not have a hectic schedule of his or her life with no “downtime” to relax.
  • Every child should be taught self-care: Teach your child the importance of eating on time and eating properly, exercise and rest. Caring for oneself by having fun will help your child stay balanced and better deal with stressful times.
  • Try and maintain a hopeful outlook: Even when your child is facing a difficult situation, help him look at the situation in a broader context and keep a long-term perspective. Although some children may be too young to consider a long-term look on their own, help him or her see that there is a future beyond the current situation and that the future can be good. An optimistic and positive outlook enables children to see the good things in life and keep going even in the hardest times.
  • Acceptance  – change is a part of life: Change often can be very scary for children and teens. Help your child see that change is part of life. New goals can replace some goals that have become unattainable. In school, point out how students have changed as they moved up in grade levels and discuss how that change has had an impact on the students.

Always remember, children also take cues from adults around them, so maybe we can incorporate some of these in our lives as well, to remain a positive, calming influence in our children’s lives. Stay safe, stay resilient!

Written by: Ambereen Pradhan, associate SOI practitioner. Ambereen, along with her husband, founded Energia SOI. As of 1st June 2019, they have work with 950+ education centres in 92 cities and 700+ schools.

SOI News

Energia SOI Wins Education Award in India

We are so excited to announce that Energia SOI, located in India, has won the award for Best Educational Program Start-Up for Kids 2018.

We are so proud of Ambereen and Sadaf, the founders of Energia SOI. They have worked so hard for this achievement!

Ambereen recently wrote to us:

“Hope you all doing fine. I am very excited to share with you Energia SOI has been nominated for India education award 2018. I still remember in May 2014, I wrote a mail to Diane asking of how I can become part of SOI. Its been almost 4 years since that day and here we are receiving an award because of SOI. I wanted to thank you all for giving us an opportunity and believing in us. I feel my journey with SOI has just started and I have a long long way to go. A dream of making SOI part of every household.” Continue reading “Energia SOI Wins Education Award in India”

learning skills, soi-ipp, The Basics

SOI System’s Approach to Learning Problems

SOI Systems is a company with a 50 year history of addressing student learning problems. Our focus has been primarily on making sure that the student’s capacities for learning are matching the expectations of the teaching situation – whether that is in a school, a university, or less formal circumstances like home schooling.

When the student’s capacities for learning do not match the expectations of the learning situation, we take a clinical approach to the situation – isolate and identify the learning problem; make a preliminary diagnosis, test to find the probable cause; prescribe an intervention; and monitor to see if the intervention is effective.

This is not a one-size-fits-all approach – it is individualized for each student-client. On the other hand, as with any clinical practice, there are broad guidelines based on years of experience. These guidelines define three general areas.

INTELLECTUAL ABILITIES AND CONCEPTS

All learning situations are predicated on a set of expectations about the student’s cognitive abilities – acquisition of new data or concepts (cognition), recall of data acquired (memory), information Continue reading “SOI System’s Approach to Learning Problems”

Classrooms

Using SOI with the Learning Disabled

Learning disabilities are defined as the absence of learning abilities.

SOI testing can be used to identify students at risk for school success.

The SOI is a broad-spectrum test measuring multiple different abilities to help you gain information about which learning abilities are developed and which are undeveloped.

TESTING MEASURES

There are many types of learning disabilities; the learning disabled do not all have the same profile. It is essential to any academic placement program to know which specific abilities have not yet been developed. This is the specific information that SOI testing provides.

SOI IS DIFFERENT

SOI training materials are designed specifically to teach one learning ability at a time to optimize learning and Continue reading “Using SOI with the Learning Disabled”

SOI News

Announcement: New Online Learning Abilities Tests

In 2010, Dr. Robert Meeker upgraded and integrated 50 years of experience into two new SOI tests. The ALA (Advanced Learning Abilities) and PLA (Primary Learning Abilities) tests were originally designed for our colleagues in other countries, but the need for an online version of SOI testing was another driving force behind the project. The ALA and PLA tests are currently in paper-pencil format and will be available online in September 2016.

To jump straight to our website for details on online testing, click here!

GENERAL INFORMATION

The addition of Critical Thinking subtests within the ALA adds value for the career-oriented client.

SOI continues to offer paper-pencil versions of both tests as a means of observing the student taking the test. Group testing is often more practical using the written forms, as well.

Students who struggle with concentration or anxiety issues find that the computer versions of the tests have allowed them to focus and relax during the test-taking process.

The ALA and PLA continue to Continue reading “Announcement: New Online Learning Abilities Tests”

Classrooms

How to Take Education Out of the Land of Oz

Step 1: Find Some Courage

Become a lion! Education needs a paradigm shift and it takes courage to initiate improved methods when the present system is an ineffective one for students.

Step 2: Find Some Patience

It takes lots of patience to wait for the results of this investment. Use the courage and patience you have today to learn the SOI way of teaching those intellectual abilities that underlie learning curriculum. Though they may not pay off as a return on your investment until students have left the school, you will see improved academics within six months.

Step 3: Get Some Facts

It is necessary to have student scores on the twenty-six abilities required for mastery of curriculum. You will also need to know the student’s best intellectual learning style for teaching. A student’s learning style is his yellow brick road, i.e., what kind of information does he handle most easily? Is he or she a figural, symbolic, or semantic learner?

Step 4

A.  Identify needs and strengths of the group and then program accordingly.
B.  Identify needs and strengths of each individual and then program accordingly.

Step 5 

Demand students’ rights to have scheduled lessons that include teaching of abilities for developing their intelligence. Continue reading “How to Take Education Out of the Land of Oz”