Classrooms, Testing

Using the SOI Creativity Short Form Test

SOME KINDS OF INTELLECTUAL GIFTEDNESS RELATE STRONGLY TO ACADEMICS, OTHERS TO LEADERSHIP, AND STILL OTHERS TO THE CREATIVE ARTS & WRITING.

The Creativity Short Form profiles the creativity areas in which the student is gifted, near-gifted, above average, average, or below average. This test is often used by schools for highly capable programs, as well as gifted and talented programs.

CREATIVITY SHORT FORM SUBTESTS

DFU: CREATIVITY USING FIGURAL UNITS
Academic Skill: creativity with things
Curricular Area: spatial/graphic arts
Strength if well-developed: good fluency and confidence with ideas
Consequences if not well-developed: will be inhibited in tasks without explicit instructions

DMU: CREATIVITY USING SEMANTIC UNITS
Academic Skill: creativity with words and ideas
Curricular Area: creative writing
Strength if well-developed: ability to produce ideas and put them together
Consequences if not well-developed: will be slow and/or vague in writing; probably poor in composition

DSR: CREATIVITY WITH RELATIONAL SYMBOLS
Academic Skill: creativity with math and symbols
Curricular Area: mathematics
Strength if well-developed: confidence and willingness to explore new math concepts
Consequences if not well-developed: difficulty understanding new math concepts; timid in exploring solutions

After reviewing the test results, if a student just misses your cut-off criteria, Continue reading “Using the SOI Creativity Short Form Test”

Testing, Unique Issues

Why Gifted Students Can Benefit from SOI Assessment

There are many kinds of giftedness. One of the most common misconceptions about gifted individuals is that they will excel in all areas.

Some individuals who are highly academically gifted can be very average when it comes to creativity. The reverse is also true. Some of the most highly creative individuals have gaps in their ability to thrive in a primarily academic setting.

Dr. Mary Meeker, who was given the Torrance Creativity Award (a prestigious national award given to an educator of gifted children), was concerned about meeting the emotional needs of the gifted child. She wrote, “Since the gifted have a tendency toward acute sensitivity, with feelings of being different and lonely, their motivation is easily diminished or extinguished when they are locked into an environment at home or at school which is neither supportive nor accepting.”

To ensure that gifted students meet their full potential, they need to be acknowledged for their giftedness, assisted with any learning issues, and given an opportunity to express themselves in ways that are meaningful to them. SOI (the Structure of Intellect) – the brain child of Dr. Meeker – offers a way to assist the gifted by giving important feedback on areas of giftedness and by identifying and correcting learning problems.

The SOI-LA, is an assessment tool that measures abilities. It measures multiple intelligences with the intention of empowering a person to develop their full potential by first understanding their own strengths and weaknesses. SOI has a long history in the field of giftedness. Dr. Meeker, who created the SOI assessment based on the theory of J.P. Guilford, was herself very gifted. And misunderstood.

When she began testing students in the school system in California, she discovered an interesting fact about gifted students – that many of them have learning difficulties that are seldom addressed. Continue reading “Why Gifted Students Can Benefit from SOI Assessment”