Classrooms, learning skills, soi-ipp, The Basics

Getting to the Root of Learning Difficulties

IPP gets to the root of learning difficulties by addressing the issues that often cause poor academic performance.

The IPP program is successful because it addresses the cause(s) of the learning difficulty. It works to improve attention span, memory, comparison & contrast thinking, eye-hand coordination, systems reasoning, and other skills essential to the learning process. This helps students perform better in school and in life.

IPP HISTORY

Years of identifying and training cognitive dysfunctions have revealed the importance of underlying physiological processes, especially focusing skills and sensory integration functions.

SOI training will help even in the face of focusing skill and/or sensory integration dysfunctions, but, obviously, the prognosis would not be as good as if there were treatment for those functions that underlie cognitive processes. To address this need, SOI developed the IPP program to Continue reading “Getting to the Root of Learning Difficulties”

certified learning, Classrooms, learning skills, soi-ipp, Testing, The Basics, training

Taking the Next Step in Learning

At SOI Systems, we provide you with practical ways to help your students succeed. SOI is a system of assessments and training materials that develop intellectual abilities and learning functions.

We equip students with the necessary intellectual skills to learn subject matter, do analytical thinking, become more creative, and, most importantly, learn how to learn.

GIFTED & TALENTED

The robustness of the SOI tests helps incorporate students with gifts in areas not usually included in other assessments. figural, symbolic, evaluation, and creativity abilities are all Continue reading “Taking the Next Step in Learning”

Classrooms, The Basics

The Brain. Did You Know?

  • Did you know an ostrich’s eye is bigger than its brain?
  • Did you know that even though your brain weighs 2% of your total body weight, it uses 25% of all oxygen you breathe and 15% of your body’s blood supply?
  • Did you know the average human brain contains around 78% water?
  • Did you know that when recognizing a persons’ face you use the right side of your brain?

Brain BlogOur brains are so intricate and interesting! Let’s look at the CEREBRUM which is the largest part of our brain; it is divided into four sections or lobes.

The FRONTAL lobe is used for expressive language, reasoning, cognition, and motor skills. Any damage to this lobe can result in changes in socialization, attention, and behavior.*

Tactile senses like pain, pressure, and touch are processed in the PARIETAL lobe. Any damage to it can cause problems with language, ability of controlling eye gaze, and verbal memory.*

The duty of the OCCIPITAL lobe is to interpret the information gathered from the eyes. If this area is damaged, the visual ability becomes so impaired that the person is unable to recognize words, colors, or objects.*

The TEMPORAL lob is responsible for our memories and processing sounds recorded by our ears. If damaged, our language skills, speech perception, and memory is affected.*

SOI is frequently asked the question, “Can you help?” The answer is definite yes!

We have used the IPP program and memory training in brain damaged and trauma victims, but scientific research and documentation has not been established.  We do know that the process is long and often times painfully frustrating to the client based on personal reports we have received, but results have happened.

WHY? BECAUSE SOI TRAINS THE BRAIN!

If you are working with a trauma victim using the SOI theory, we would love to get your input and results to share with others.

To learn more about SOI online testing, click here!

written by: Jody Brooks, SOI Systems general manager

*www.enkivillage.com/parts-of-the-brain-and-their-functions.html

learning skills, training

Vision: Focusing Skills

Vision: “The ability of sight, the manner in which one sees or conceives of something”

Think about it:

If you are unable to scan horizontally – a visual requisite for reading and closing letters into words that are meaningful – your achievement level drops.

If you are unable to distinguish small differences (visual discrimination), which is especially critical for sustained reading over an extended period of time, your achievement level drops.

If you are unable to understand vocabulary and verbal ideas due to visual fatigue and loss of concentration, your achievement level drops.

If you have jerky eye movement when following an object, excessive head movement, overshooting the target, fatigue, and clumsiness – symptoms of poor eye tracking – your achievement level drops.

The SOI-IPP program has been able to screen people with these conditions and prepare a course of action. For severe cases of these vision issues, the best therapy is a developmental optometrist. SOI realizes the value of such treatment and encourages people to pursue this venue.

Vision can be the hindrance for learning success. Students receive the OK from the school nurse that their vision is 20/20, but classroom performance says otherwise. If a student is suspected of having vision problems, every avenue should be pursued to correct the deficiency. Build a foundation: strengthen the teamwork of the eyes so the learning experience is enjoyable.

SOI has designed a new vision workbook that targets these focusing skills! The workbook concentrates on the areas of visual tracking and stamina. Parents and teachers are invited to use this tool as part of their student exercises in developing good vision skills. Whether you are in a school, clinic, or at home, this workbook is great option! Take a look at the sample pages below.

written by: Jody Brooks, SOI Systems general manager

soi-ipp

Addressing Learning Difficulties

IPP (Integrated Practice Protocol) is one of our most popular programs at SOI.

Why? Because it addresses visual, auditory, and sensory-motor skills through a series of exercises customized to meet every student’s needs! Each student gets to work on building his/her skills.

The IPP program is a system for treating learning difficulties. It works to improve attention span, memory, comparison/contrast thinking, eye-hand coordination, systems reasoning and other skills essential to the learning process, helping students perform better in school and in life.

With IPP, the following areas are screened. An explanation for each is given.

SENSORY INTEGRATION

  • Balance­: Balance is a motor skill.  At the beginning of life, motor activity develops before mental actions, then both work together and coexist, and, finally, mental action subordinates motor activity. The premise here is that proper development of motor skills is critical for learning­ – that motor experiences are the foundation of mental development.  When motor skills are not fully developed, cognitive learning can be affected.
  • Crossing the Midline/Mentally Crossing the Midline: When an individual is able to cross the midline (literally reach across or move across the middle of the body), it means that his/her  brain has learned to plan and carry out a sequence of movements in proper order.  When internalized, it leads to the ability to know your right from your left.  We use ourselves as a reference point in understanding the orientation of an external object or a word.  If a child had difficulty in understanding his/her own left and right, he/she will have difficulty with the  proper orientation of a word or letter, and this may cause word or letter reversals.
  • Body in Space: An individual should know where his/her body is in space with or without benefit of the visual system.  Knowing this contributes to the knowledge and development of left/right, directions, spatial relations, visualization, etc.

FOCUSING SKILLS Continue reading “Addressing Learning Difficulties”

Testing

The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far from the Tree

ASSESSING PARENTS AND CHILDREN: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

On many of the occasions where I have assessed both parents and their children, I have been fascinated by the results. Here are two examples.

Many years ago, I assessed a father and son. Both had a high incidence of gifted scores, were left-handed, and had significant hidden visual perception issues. In the case of the father, the vision issues didn’t prevent him from becoming a good reader. He attained good scores in English literature, qualifying to be a teacher and entering a Master’s program. The son, whose visual perception problems were all in the same areas, but who scored at a lower level in them, almost didn’t graduate from Grade 13 because of his reading and writing difficulties.

Both excelled in mathematics and symbolic thinking. The father eventually entered business as a financial adviser and the son, who had never read a novel or written a report without assistance, became an engineer. Both were very successful.

When I was managing an SOI/IPP program in an alternate school here in Vancouver, I assessed three members of one family. The mother was SOI assessed as she was being trained to help with the IPP program. The two siblings that were tested were attending the school and taking IPP training. The mother was Continue reading “The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far from the Tree”