learning skills, Testing, training

SOI Memory Training

The Structure of Intellect assesses many different learning abilities. What often shows up as the lowest overall ability is memory – both visual and auditory.

If you think of memory as “the developed art of paying attention,” then you begin to understand why this is a growing concern in education, especially in elementary school.Comprehension is diminished by lower memory ability and problem-solving becomes frustrating when memory ability fails to recall correct information. Fortunately, SOI is in the business of training memory!

MEMORY FACTS

  • memory is the ability to retrieve information that has been previously understood
  • a lack of memory abilities can be inhibiting or disabling in the acquisition of basic learning skills
  • memory is one of the easiest learning abilities to train
  • you will see improvement with fifteen minutes of daily memory training

MEMORY MATRIX

Memory Matrix is our most Continue reading “SOI Memory Training”

Testing

SOI Online Learning Abilities Testing

Have you ever wondered about your learning strengths and weaknesses? This is the perfect opportunity for you to learn how you learn best! With our new online tests, you will find out more about your learning style and abilities – memory, comprehension, evaluation, critical thinking, and more – and the roles that they play in your life, education, and career.

We offer three testing packages: PLA (kindergarten – third grade), ALA (third grade – adult), or ALA with careers. Each package includes a pre-test consultation, a learning abilities profile/analysis, and a post-test consultation.

Upon completion of your (or your child’s) test, you will receive a full learning abilities analysis. You will also have a consultation with a member of the SOI staff to review the results, discuss any concerns, and receive suggestions for areas that may need improvement. Personalized training materials are available at an additional cost.

Please contact us for details and pricing, and with any questions you may have. We look forward to hearing from you and helping you take this next step in learning more about yourself!

Classrooms

Figuring Out Figural Learners

One of the most enlightening aspects of my training with SOI was learning about figural learners.  When my youngest son, Christian, was 6 years old, I discovered through SOI testing that he had sensory integration issues and was a figural learner.

What is a figural learner?  A learner who has high figural-spatial skills, but is lower in semantic and symbolic learning and learns best by using concrete, hands-on, three dimensional information.  They see pictures in their mind and excel when they are able to learn by seeing, touching, and doing.  Most young children start out as figural learners.  My son Christian was in a Montessori environment for pre-school and excelled there.

However, traditional school environments are mostly semantic and symbolic and not a place where figural learners flourish.  Most traditional reading programs are phonics-based or whole-word reading, which is not the best reading method for figural learners. Many students who are highly figural find they do well when they are out of school.  This is when they can use their real world figural skills in careers such as graphic design, film production, interior design, art, or even in careers such as plumbing, automotive repair, and construction.

For those of us who are in an elementary environment, the issue is how can we help students who are figural learners succeed? Our school, Shady Oak Learning, incorporates strengths-based learning, where we use students strong areas to motivate them and help strengthen weak areas. In addition to strengthening semantic and symbolic skills with SOI modules and Certified Learning, here are some other resources we use to boost figural learners:

SOI LOCAN – This is a figural reading method that all of our young students enjoy!  They recognize the glyphs, play bingo and translate those later to words, sentences and paragraphs. Continue reading “Figuring Out Figural Learners”