SOI News, training

New Product Launch: SOI Memory Handbook

M = My   

E = Everyday   

M = Memory  

O = Often   

R =  Refuses to   

Y = Yield Information

Does this definition of MEMORY sound familiar?  Do you forget why you walked into a room? Where you left your car keys? A neighbor or friend’s name?

Memory is a major concern for many people. It doesn’t matter if you are 8 or 80; we all need memory training to keep our brain sharp.  Visual and auditory memory is the backbone of school and career advancement. Dr. Mary Meeker recognized this deficiency back in 1977 when she designed and published the Memory Handbooks I & II.

Today we have incorporated those two brain training exercise books into one: the SOI Memory Handbook. It works to improve all areas of memory, including: figural, spatial, place, symbolic, and verbal. Using this handbook will increase your ability to Continue reading “New Product Launch: SOI Memory Handbook”

Testing, training

SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks

What’s the big deal about CFU? Ask Brian.

“Brian can’t tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 and he sure can’t begin to read! He’s severe! Good luck on that one!” That was my first introduction to a very “special” student as I began my career in education.

Brian had a problem with CFU. CFU is just one of six intellectual abilities that you have to have to be ready to read. What does that mean? And what does identifying a picture tell me about being able to read?

In the world of the Structure of Intellect, CFU stands for Cognition of Figural Units. It is the ability to look at a picture or representation of an object that has been partially erased and to be able to tell what that object is. In other words, it is the ability of your brain to fill in the blanks and make sense of what seems at first to be only random marks on the page. This skill, when applied to letters or symbols, makes up the gateway to reading.

Remember picture finding in your “Highlights for Children” magazines? It wasn’t just a fun activity, or a not so fun activity if you were unsuccessful. There was a reason for it! I now know that each of Brian’s eyes were seeing something different. That “dreamy” look he had when I looked at him now makes sense. How do you tell the difference in a 5 and a 3 when one eye places the right angle at one spot on the page and the other eye places it elsewhere? And, maybe it doesn’t place it in the same place the next Continue reading “SOI CFU: Filling in the Blanks”

inspiration

SOI Changes Lives in Many Ways

In 1988, I experienced SOI for the first time when my now-grown son struggled in the third grade. He was given the SOI test and completed sessions throughout the year at Brainworks (formerly of Carrollton). After I retired from teaching school in 2002, I became the math coordinator at Brainworks and learned a lot more about the SOI tests and modules.

In the spring of 2008, one of my adult clients at Brainworks was James O’Connell. James had finished a tour of duty in the army and was back home  trying to figure out what to do with his life. James had attended Carrollton schools and struggled because of his ADHD. He was apprehensive about going to college because of his past school experiences and struggles with math/algebra.

When I first began working with James, I had no idea what a big part of my life James and his mother, Patti O’Connell, would become! I still hear from Patti from time to time whenever James reaches a milestone in life. A couple years ago, she emailed me to remind me of where James began when I first met him.

James’ initial SOI test was on October 31, 2007. At that time, we estimated that James would need approximately 73 hours of SOI cognitive skills training and 40 hours of work with me on math and algebra. That amounted to about 50-60 two-hour sessions.

After only 38 hours of session time, however, James was Continue reading “SOI Changes Lives in Many Ways”

Classrooms, The Basics

The Brain. Did You Know?

  • Did you know an ostrich’s eye is bigger than its brain?
  • Did you know that even though your brain weighs 2% of your total body weight, it uses 25% of all oxygen you breathe and 15% of your body’s blood supply?
  • Did you know the average human brain contains around 78% water?
  • Did you know that when recognizing a persons’ face you use the right side of your brain?

Brain BlogOur brains are so intricate and interesting! Let’s look at the CEREBRUM which is the largest part of our brain; it is divided into four sections or lobes.

The FRONTAL lobe is used for expressive language, reasoning, cognition, and motor skills. Any damage to this lobe can result in changes in socialization, attention, and behavior.*

Tactile senses like pain, pressure, and touch are processed in the PARIETAL lobe. Any damage to it can cause problems with language, ability of controlling eye gaze, and verbal memory.*

The duty of the OCCIPITAL lobe is to interpret the information gathered from the eyes. If this area is damaged, the visual ability becomes so impaired that the person is unable to recognize words, colors, or objects.*

The TEMPORAL lob is responsible for our memories and processing sounds recorded by our ears. If damaged, our language skills, speech perception, and memory is affected.*

SOI is frequently asked the question, “Can you help?” The answer is definite yes!

We have used the IPP program and memory training in brain damaged and trauma victims, but scientific research and documentation has not been established.  We do know that the process is long and often times painfully frustrating to the client based on personal reports we have received, but results have happened.

WHY? BECAUSE SOI TRAINS THE BRAIN!

If you are working with a trauma victim using the SOI theory, we would love to get your input and results to share with others.

To learn more about SOI online testing, click here!

written by: Jody Brooks, SOI Systems general manager

*www.enkivillage.com/parts-of-the-brain-and-their-functions.html

Classrooms, soi-ipp

Alternate Schools – Alternate Programs

There is a very strong case to support the existence of alternate programs. Most people are aware of alternate programs that are geared to students who are at risk socially or who struggle academically. Many students can be guided to become successful, productive members of the community with the right kind of intervention.

What you may be less likely to know about is that there is a profile for the “Gifted with Learning Problems” student. These are the ones we refer to as having mountains and valleys.

These students’ potential may be completely derailed as their needs go unmet. They may be brilliant in math with visual or auditory issues that impede reading success. Or they may excel in reading and composition but struggle with algebra.

Teachers are often aghast when their most brilliant students choose to pass on higher education. I’m always amazed at how many truly intelligent people are unaware of their gifts. Or they know they have potential but cannot face the education system with their problems and, for them, so many doors close. The truth is, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Dr. Robert Meeker has pointed out that most learning problems are not profound. They are for the most part undiagnosed and untreated. In our school system, the focus is usually on teaching the child with problems to “cope.”

Most learning problems can be helped – poor auditory processing included – if you understand what’s needed and have the tools to deal with it. Likewise, most problems with math can also be corrected.

Continue reading “Alternate Schools – Alternate Programs”