Classrooms, inspiration

SOI Success In My Classroom

I’ve had the pleasure of being the SOI/IPP teacher at Southcrest Christian School in Lubbock, Texas for four years. In those four years I’ve learned more about people and education than I ever did in college, and I know there is so much more to learn!

I think the thing that gives me the most pleasure in working my students is the self-confidence and happiness I see develop in them. I have so many success stories to share, but I will just give some snapshots of a few of them.

One particular student began to ride his scooter and bike all over the block after working in the IPP lab; he couldn’t do that before! Another student went to Disneyland with his family and was so much more confident; he skipped and danced with the Chipmunks in front of a room full of people. His mom sent me a picture of this proud moment!

My own son Continue reading “SOI Success In My Classroom”

inspiration

There Is Always Time To Speak Words That Inspire

I can vividly remember the moments when someone spoke directly to me with kind words that helped define how I thought about myself.

One such memory was as far back as 11 years old. I perhaps did not interpret the words to mean that I was being viewed as trustworthy and dependable, but all these years later I recognize the gift of my teacher’s words. Being a very shy child, when Mr. Schneider asked for my help and shared his respect for me, I began to see myself differently. Other moments of hearing sincere words spoken to me have continued to inspire me and remain memories stored that are mine to recall as I reflect on my years lived.

Through using the SOI (Structure of Intellect) Assessments and Development Programs, I have always enjoyed sharing words with a struggling student that help define strengths that had gone undetected. Even sharing that there are areas that need strengthening can inspire a new understanding of the challenges being faced. It simply is the power of taking the time to look another in the eyes and bring hope and respect that lights the spark necessary to keep trying.

Challenge yourself to look for moments to help redefine how someone feels about themselves. If you are seeking help for yourself or another because of learning challenges, for a career change, or enhancement of abilities already developed, reach out to SOI Systems for more information. There are answers, words, inspiration, and opportunities to improve learning potential.

We do have time in the day to use words that help guide others to greater confidence and purpose. It may be your name and face another reflects on with appreciation.

written by: Diane Hochstein, Senior SOI Program Consultant & President of SOI Service Company

The Basics

Don’t Miss It!

Early in the 1990s, I knew in no unmistakable terms that I was to serve “the least of these.” Throughout my career as an educator, I endeavored to do that. But late in 2014, I began to ponder the question again with greater intensity: “Who ARE the least of these that I am compelled to serve?”

Since I had spent a good deal of my time in socioeconomically disadvantaged schools, I had always assumed it was “the poor.” But recently, as I began working with a broader range of students, I realized that “the least of these” fit into an entirely different paradigm. The least of these were not just those who had no material advantages. Difficulty in learning, caused by any number of difficulties, became the great equalizer in this regard.

Was it lack of resources? Yes, for sure, but not material resources. The answer lay in cognitive/academic, social/emotional, and physio-neurological resources. Dr. Mary Meeker outlined it in 1975 to the U.S. Office of Education in the Meeker Paradigm. I had known about the Meeker Paradigm since my earliest exposure to SOI. But as of late, it began taking on new meaning as I pondered the reason for the impact of SOI and why it had so completely changed my approach to learning and teaching and set me on a course that would inform the rest of my life’s work.

As I considered the question, I was admonished by a friend, a fellow educator, and grandparent of one of my students, “You don’t Continue reading “Don’t Miss It!”